Tag Archives: Contributor

IDG Contributor Network: How Google Cloud Will Bring AI, Machine Learning to Enterprise Software

Google has been quietly hard at work for some time now, developing its artificial intelligence and cloud capabilities to do something new. And at the Google’s Cloud Next conference in March the company announced that it was developing tech to aid machine learning for enterprise business.

Eric Schmidt, the chairman of Google’s parent company, Alphabet, said the company had invested $ 30 billion into the Google Cloud Platform in order to develop its analysis and artificial intelligence capabilities for the program. The move, he said, was an effort to get into the game of big data, information Schmidt said nations would fight for.

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IDG Contributor Network: Catching up with Adaptive Insights and ruminating over the future

I’ve written in the past about Adaptive Insights, a Silicon Valley-based company in the corporate performance management (CPM) space.

CPM is a term that describes vendors who help organizations plan and model in order to get better insights over future organizational performance. Since I last caught up with the company, they have enjoyed 30% annual growth and now have 3,500 global customers spread across all the different financial/ERP products — from Xero at the smaller end of town all the way up to SAP.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

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IDG Contributor Network: Raspberry Pi Foundation announces the best return gift

The first Raspberry Pi device was released on February 29, 2012. Celebrating the fifth anniversary of the credit card sized, single-board computer, the Raspberry Pi Foundation has announced the perfect return gift: Raspberry Pi Zero W.

You guessed it right, the W in the name stands for “wireless.” This is a new version of Raspberry Pi Zero that comes with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capabilities at a mere $ 10.

A few days ago, I spent $ 12 to get a Bluetooth dongle for my Xbox One. Here I am getting a full fledged computer with wireless capabilities for less than what I paid for the dongle.

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IDG Contributor Network: SaaS is eating the infrastructure world

In many ways, we can compare the future of the software world to the emergence of self-driving cars. Just as we’re faced with questions around a unified set of operational standards for all companies eager to remove drivers from behind the wheel, serverless computing poses a similar set of challenges as software eats further and further into the infrastructure stack.

When that happens, the driver (or in this case, the infrastructure) will disappear into the background and the car (in this case, software applications) will take center stage. Whether we’re talking driverless cars or serverless computing, it’s going to be a bumpy road ahead as companies start to adapt. Here’s a look at what will happen when software eats the infrastructure world.

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IDG Contributor Network: Red Hat expected to rake in $2.4 billion in revenue this year

The king of Linux, Red Hat, continues its growth as a leading Linux vendor that’s betting big on the cloud. Yesterday, the company announced financial results for its second quarter of fiscal year 2017 ended August 31, 2016.

The company generated $ 600 million in revenue for the quarter, a 19 percent year-over-year increase. Red Hat is often credited with creating a business model around Linux and Open Source: a subscription based service and support model.

Subscription revenue for the quarter was $ 531 million, which accounts for 89% of total revenue. It was a 20% year-over-year increase. Based on these numbers we can safely assume that Red Hat will be generating revenues around $ 2.415 billion in this fiscal year. That makes Red Hat the most successful pure open source company to date.

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IDG Contributor Network: Architecture as code: The key to cloud success

Enterprises are plagued by fire drills. Experts in enterprise architecture, operations, and on application teams are dragged into unexpected issues, and spend precious hours, days, and even weeks debugging what are ultimately low-value problems. The most common of these issues is applications that work in test, but are mysteriously not working in production. The conversation usually goes something like this:

App Dev: Are you sure the environments are configured the same?

Ops: Yup!

App Dev: Are you sure?

Ops: Shoot, I missed a checkbox while configuring the node, it works now!

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IDG Contributor Network: HP’s OpenSwitch becomes a Linux Foundation Project

HP’s open source networking operating system, OpenSwitch, is now a Linux Foundation project.

Many industry players are joining the project, including Broadcom, Cavium, Extreme Networks, LinkedIn, Mellanox, Nephos Inc., P4.org, Quattro Networks, SnapRoute and, of course, Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

OpenSwitch is full-featured, Linux-based modular and modern network operating system that provides support for traditional and cloud networking environments.

Commenting on the arrival of OpenSwicth Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation said, “OpenSwitch brings another important ingredient of the open networking stack to The Linux Foundation. We’re looking forward to working with this community to advance networking across the enterprise.”

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CIO Cloud Computing


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IDG Contributor Network: An intelligent cloud?

For the most part, many of the current cloud offerings have previous frameworks that could run in a local infrastructure as well. New cloud offerings are what I would call “cloud only” — a series of tools that only exist in the cloud.

Here is a sample of Microsoft Azure’s new offerings. Notice, unlike previous announcement concerning virtualization, databases and operating systems, these all have a different ring to them.

  • Emotion API — Personalize experiences with emotion recognition
  • Language understanding Intelligent Service API — Teach your applications to understand commands
  • Text Analytics API — Perform text to sentiment analysis, extract key phrases and detect topic and languages
  • Face API –detect, identify organize and tag faces in photos
  • Speech API — convert speech to text and back again and understand its intent
  • Recommendations API –Predict which products your customers are most interested in based on their previous transactions

What makes this all possible is that large cloud providers of non-hosting services, such as Search, are opening their internal engines, which have done billions of queries and millions of hours of analysis, to the public. Google and Microsoft have invested billions of dollars into understanding their data in meaningful ways. More importantly, they have existing revenue-generating business based on these abilities so they continue to invest heavily. Mix that with a hefty dose of competition and fear and you can see how we got to where we are today: the intelligent cloud.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

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IDG Contributor Network: No IPO, debt funding instead. Intacct gets some fuel

Cloud ERP vendor Intacct last week announced that it has secured debt funding by way of a $ 40 million facility from Silicon Valley Bank. This comes at the same time as Intacct announced year-on-year new bookings increasing by some 34 percent.

Intacct has an interesting job in front of it — it is a mid-market vendor and therefore fills the space between tools designed for small and mid-sized businesses (QuickBooks and Xero, for example) and more enterprise-focused tools such as NetSuite, SAP, and Oracle. The mid-market space is a difficult one — customers have a plethora of different requirements and often the complexity, if not the budgets, are similar to those of larger enterprise organizations.

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IDG Contributor Network: OpenStack Summit — checking in after another six months

I’ve been following OpenStack since its inception half a dozen years ago.

Back then the fledgling open source cloud operating system was a little project created jointly by Rackspace and NASA. A lot of time, massive amounts of funding and a few different value propositions have gone under the bridge and now OpenStack has its own foundation, huge vendor buy-in and a growing number of production deployments at scale.

Perhaps the biggest indicator that OpenStack has come of age was the (admittedly jarring) sight of Gartner analyst Donna Scott standing on stage in the first day’s keynote. While Scott’s talk missed the mark by a mile (she spoke at length about the Gartner bi-modal model, a hotly contested topic, but her talk was more of a conceptual piece targeted at a CIO audience, completely different to the 7,500 primarily developer-based attendees at the summit), the wiseness or otherwise of having the talk in that setting, and the fact that Gartner was prepared to go on stage and anoint OpenStack as actually a viable product, was a massive achievement for OpenStack Foundation Jonathan Bryce and his team.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing


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